The House of Orlock Rises

The first three of my precious Orlocks stand ready to go to war!

I feel like I really turned a corner with my painting. If you’ve been following along, I was complaining last week about my inability to paint metal. Well it seems like I figured out the secret, cause it turned out way better on these three guys. I started painting these guys with the white tabards, because white fabric is always a pain in the ass to get looking right, especially from a black undercoat. So when it turned out so flipping well (if I do say so myself) I was like “right boyo, you’d better put some effort into the rest of them as well!”). I also tried doing the skin very differently to how I usually do, and I’m rather pleased with the results. I tried to get it to look like the way FW does theirs, with very little dark recesses, and I think it looks pretty sharp so I’m gonna work this way in the future. Hella easier than the standard GW studio method as well.

Things that could use some work are the eyes, which I’m usually fine at so I dunno why they’re all a bit wonky, and the bases, which I tried to get to look like the official paint job but couldn’t quite work out how they’d done it.

But rather than ramble on like I usually do, I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves for once! Click the images for giganto-versions.

I wasn’t sure how to do the servo claw, so I asked the guys and they unanimously voted for construction-equipment-yellow. But when I put the yellow base coat on I thought I’d made a huge mistake as it was way too bright and contrasty, but I weathered the hell out of it this afternoon and I’m much more happy with it now. Gives him that nice colourful classic Necro look too.

Lemme know what you think. I’m for one am quite chuffed!

 

~ Ross

15 thoughts on “The House of Orlock Rises

  1. That’s awesome Ross! What was the difference between the FW painting style and the GW style? I’m interested to see the comparison and what you did differently. Your fleshtones look amazing and I’m especially loving how you’ve done your fabrics (cloth, leather) and if anything it looks more work-intensive than the typically 3-layer studio paint job. What’s the secret?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, dude!

      I suppose what I’m referring to with the GW studio style is starting with a much darker base colour and/or washing the recesses back to a darker colour. In Straken here for example, you can see how all the creases in his face an between his muscles are a very dark brown.

      With Forgeworld, their painters paint with much lighter tones, like this fella here.

      It’s somewhat disingenuous to call it the FW style, as it’s a style that you can see all over the place from model painters, especially painters of larger scale models than GW’s. This magazine has some great examples and tutorials: http://figurementors.com

      The fabrics are actually pretty much the 3-layer studio method, with one or two extra steps. I don’t generally keep track of my recipes as I go, but I’ll be painting another few of them this week so I’ll keep track of what I’m doing and write up a more concise step-by-step then.

      I did write down my skin recipe though, so here it is:

      1. Basecoat Bugman’s Glow
      2. Layer Bugman’s Glow mixed with Flayed One Flesh (1:1)
      3. Layer Bugman’s Glow mixed with Flayed One Flesh (1:3)
      4. Highlight Flayed One Flesh
      5. Highlight Pallid Wych Flesh

      Like

      1. Awesome – nice breakdown. I knew Forgeworld tend to favour a more “realistic” paint scheme since working with resin can mean the edges and finishes aren’t as smooth as plastic while GW paints models primarily for photography and it helps having a more stark contrast in surfaces and highlights. But, I’d never really thought of the actual difference in painting methodology (I just assumed people who favour less contrast just start from a brighter base coat which is something I’ve always done myself). Consider myself now educated!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. They look really good! When you refer to the forgeworld method, is that something you trial & errored or is there a tutorial you know of? Agree with you on the dark recesses that GW does on faces & muscles.

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    1. Thanks very much!

      Nah I just looked at the pictures and tried to copy it and it worked out pretty well first time! It’s a technique you see quite often from painters of larger models. This website has a ton of excellent (if very intensive) tutorials. http://figurementors.com

      My recipe is slightly more straightforward, as befits a smaller model:

      1. Basecoat Bugman’s Glow
      2. Layer Bugman’s Glow mixed with Flayed One Flesh (1:1)
      3. Layer Bugman’s Glow mixed with Flayed One Flesh (1:3)
      4. Highlight Flayed One Flesh
      5. Highlight Pallid Wych Flesh

      Like

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